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A decentralised infrastructure for fighting modern slavery

Research
UX Research
Client Research
Strategy
Brand Strategy
Campaign Strategy
UX Strategy
Content Strategy
Information Architecture
Language
Taxonomy
Mapping


Creating brand, UX and content strategies for the Church of England's initiative to fight modern slavery in the UK, we provided information architecture that leveraged the unique decentralised structure of the Anglican Church to resource and engage users throughout the country.

 

IMPACT

Dedicated page for reporting cases of modern slavery

Dedicated page for reporting cases of modern slavery

Tailored to CofE infrastructure and decentralised regions

Tailored to CofE infrastructure and decentralised regions

Bi-directional strategy for end users & regional bases

Bi-directional strategy for end users & regional bases

Launch and impact mentioned in UK parliament

Launch and impact mentioned in UK parliament

The unique decentralised structures of the Church of England creates a strategic opportunity to mobilise individuals, throughout the UK, to act as the first eyes and ears in the fight against modern slavery.

45.8 million people are estimated to be trapped in modern slavery with close to 12,000 in the UK alone. Following our work on the War on Wonga for the Archbishop of Canterbury, we were approached by the Church of England to provide strategy and architecture for their new initiative tackling modern slavery and actively supporting the work of existing statutory and non-statutory bodies in the sector.

Client and UX Research was conducted including interviews and sector analysis to produce brand, content and UX strategies for the new project.

We created a narrative for the brand and specific language terms for the campaign,  developing user flows and diagrams that were presented to the client explaining the content touchpoints and potential areas of engagement for users. This UX and content strategy was based upon a contextual understanding of the hierarchical structures of the Church of England, how communications pass between these levels and the operational models of the bodies who would respond to reported cases of modern slavery, including charities, NGOs and police forces.

Following this we developed further information architecture, including a taxonomy, for the website, events and resources, alongside wireframes for the new site.